Cultivating a culture of intolerance

In the wake of the murder of nine African-American’s by a white supremacist in Charleston, South Carolina this week, Australians reacted the same way we always do when a “newsworthy” gun-related killing takes place in the USA.

With disbelief, coupled with a glimmer of smug superiority.

We shake our collective heads at a nation that owns almost half of the world’s civilian-owned guns and wonder when someone will have the courage to take on the seemingly all-powerful NRA.

We wonder how change will come if the deaths of TWENTY five and six year-olds in a mass shooting wasn’t enough to shake America out of its gun-loving ways.

And we gloat about Australia’s lack of mass shootings since laws were tightened following the Port Arthur massacre in 1996.

Many of us have watched with horror as nothing more than sheer racism has seen countless African-American men gunned down at the hands of white police in the US.

Again, we got our smugness on. We’re better than that. We don’t have mass shootings. Our cops aren’t killing black people at a rate three times higher than they’re killing white people.

We tell ourselves that America has big problems. Problems that we don’t have. We tell ourselves that they can learn from us; that we’ve got it right.

Except we’re wrong.

We might not have the same number of gun deaths as the US does (not even close) – among civilian or law enforcement populations.

But it’s not like we’re a shining beacon of peace here in Australia. Least of all if you’re a non-white person.

The racist persecution and killings of people of colour is quieter here, somehow.

We* don’t talk about Aboriginal deaths in custody. We don’t talk about the fact that Aboriginal people make up approximately 30% of the Northern Territory’s general population, but 85% of their prison population. We don’t talk about the fact that Aboriginal women are 45 times more likely than white women to be victims of domestic violence. We don’t talk about the forced closures of Aboriginal communities that are happening simply due to Australia’s ingrained racism.

We don’t talk about the gross abuse of the human rights of predominantly non-white asylum seekers in Manus and Nauru. We don’t talk about the fact that these asylum seekers have become political footballs, real humans used to further political agendas.

The murders that took place in South Carolina this week are no different to the deaths of Australian Aboriginals in custody. They’re no different to the murders of countless people of colour at the hands of white police in America, which in turn, are no different to the appalling manner in which successive Australian governments have demonised asylum seekers.

They’re all things that happen when we allow the cultivation of a culture of racism and intolerance. A culture that, in Australia at least, right now comes from the top; from our so-called leaders. “Leaders” who will allow the passing of laws that will punish those that speak out about the human rights violations taking place in Australia’s offshore detention centres. “Leaders” who refuse to act to end the sexual assaults of children in those centres. “Leaders” who will forcibly remove Aboriginal communities from the lands they have lived on for tens of thousands of years.

While we decry the latest in a long line of mass shootings in the USA, and discuss the blatant white supremacy that led to them, we need to also look at what’s happening in our own country.

Because the only real difference that I can see is the presence, or absence, of guns.

*Obviously, this is a generalisation. But, while there are some amazing people in Australia who are doing all they can to address these issues, there are obviously those who either don’t care, or support the things being done in our names.

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Where was Prime Minister Abbott’s White Ribbon?

Earlier this year, I wrote the following post:

“Today, May 7th, is National Domestic Violence Remembrance Day. A day to remember those who have died, and the ones left behind, due to domestic and family violence.

A day to remember those that we ignored, that we failed.

Now, it’s inevitable that someone out there will respond saying that we didn’t simply ignore these deaths. And on that, I call bullshit. Sure, we dedicated several column inches in daily newspapers, and segments on the nightly news to those that lost their lives. And then, when all the hand-wringing and discussions on how awful it was, we forgot. We moved on with our lives, without taking any action, until news of the next death broke. Then it became more collective hand-wringing, more wondering about why it had happened once more. And again, we moved on.

From each of these deaths that were reported in the news, there will be another that the media didn’t pick up on. For each of these deaths, countless more women and children will still be living in terror and danger. For each of these deaths that were reported from the beginning of this year, we made our comments about how awful it was, and we moved on: 

– Therese Brown, 52 years old. Died 3 January 2014.

– Victoria Comrie Cullen, 39 years old. Died 22 January 2014.

– Luke Batty, 11 years old. Died 12 February 2014.

– Margaret Tannous, 47 years old. Died 17 February 2014.

– Baby girl (name unknown), 11 months old. Died 2 April 2014.

– Fiona Warzywoda, 33 years old. Died 16 April 2014.

– Savannah, 4 years old, and Indianna, 3 years old. Died 20 April 2014.

– Woman (name unknown), 47 years old. Died 30 April 2014.

 

And these are just the tip of the iceberg, the deaths that have occurred and been reported on in the last five months.

Domestic and family violence is a national emergency. And a national disgrace. We need to stop the silence, the quick mention on the daily news, the forgetting. We need real, tangible action. We need political will. And for that, we need a leader.”

Today, just over six months later, and on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (or, White Ribbon Day), I can sadly add over sixty more names to the list of those who have died as a result of men’s violence against women and children. Over sixty more people that we, as a society, have collectively failed.

Today, on White Ribbon Day, I watched as the Australian Prime Minister – and self-appointment Minister for Women – walked into question time at Parliament House, White Ribbon-less. While almost other member of parliament was clearly displaying their White Ribbon (the global symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women), the Minister for Women, rather conspicuously, was not.

Prime Minister Abbott enters question time on White Ribbon Day - sans White Ribbon. (Source: The Guardian)

Prime Minister Abbott enters question time on White Ribbon Day – sans White Ribbon.
(Source: The Guardian)

At a White Ribbon Day breakfast yesterday, Prime Minister Abbott said “domestic violence has no friends anywhere. It’s just wrong, it’s never justified, it’s never excused”.

But the Prime Minister is wrong. The findings from the 2013 National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey (NCAS) suggest that men’s violence against women in Australia is excused. And people do find ways to justify it.

I have written before about the PM’s lack of action on men’s violence against women, and I will likely do so again. I will do it not because I wish to continually attack one man, but because this is a man who did appoint himself as the Minister for Women. A man who leads a government that continues to perpetuate sexism and inequality – two things that we know contribute greatly to men’s violence against women.

When Prime Minister Abbott speaks at a White Ribbon Day breakfast he is preaching to the choir. And he’s doing it in a room of media representatives who will report his words.

When Minister for Women Abbott walks into Parliament, on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, without wearing the global symbol of that day that almost all of his political colleagues were, his actions speak louder than any of his previously spoken words.

 

If you, or someone you know, is experience domestic violence you can get 24/7 help by contacting 1800Respect via their website or on 1800 737 732. 

We are failing women. And it’s killing them.

Last weekend I was reading a story online about a family from a small town in rural Australia. A family that included three children. Three children who, along with their mother, were murdered by their father. The story allowed comments (that have since been removed), and although conventional internet wisdom suggests “Don’t Read The Comments”, I went ahead and read them anyway. Until I got to one that said:

“This wasn’t a case of domestic violence. Domestic violence is the repeated beating of a woman over a long period of time”.

It was a comment that blew my mind.

It was a comment that made me angry.

It was a comment that had gotten over 60 ‘likes’.

Today, VicHealth released the findings from the 2013 National Community Attitudes towards Violence Against Women Survey (NCAS). And those findings are horrifying. Horrifying, yet not surprising.

The eye-opening stats just seem to go on and on.

I suspect that in the coming days, we will hear more about these findings. And I hope we do, because Australia is failing. It’s failing its women. It’s failing its men. It’s failing its children.

The person who commented on the story about the family in that small town, and those who had ‘liked’ it, are not alone in their thinking. And those ideas don’t occur in a vacuum. They occur in a country that privileges men above women and tolerates misogyny.

They occur in a country where attitudes regarding men’s violence against women means that domestic violence remains hidden, victim-blaming is prevalent, and jokes about rape are considered funny.

The survey found that over a quarter of people believe that men make better political leaders. A belief that occurs in a nation where senior politicians and media personalities were the perpetrators of gender-based bullying against our first female Prime Minister.

The survey found that 12% of people believe that when jobs are scarce, men have more right to a job than women. A belief that occurs in a nation where our male Prime Minister named himself as the Minister for Women.

The survey found that there has been a decrease in the number of people who believe that violence against women is common. A belief that occurs despite police in New South Wales alone receiving an average of 94 domestic violence report every day.

The survey found that almost 1 in 5 Australian’s believes that a woman is partly to blame if she is sexually assaulted while she’s intoxicated. A belief that occurs in a nation where alcohol-fuelled street violence is “horrific”, but the rape of a woman is “an unfortunate reminder”.

We need to change, Australia. Because men’s violence against women doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It happens along a continuum.

When we ask “why didn’t she leave” instead of “why did he hit her”, we’re blaming her.

When we laugh at a rape joke, we’re telling the world that rape is okay.

When we excuse street harassment with “boys will be boys”, we’re telling women that their safety is not important.

As I’ve said before, when we tell women not to drink too much or not to wear a short skirt, we’re telling them to make sure that he rapes someone else, instead of telling him not to rape.

These factors, and many more, enable the climate in our country that lets men’s violence against women thrive. And each one of us is responsible for changing it – by not laughing at that joke, by not blaming that victim, by speaking up when we see or hear sexist attitudes.

And we need to do it fast. Because we’re failing women. And it’s killing them.

The $7 GP fee – poverty shaming and why it matters.

Following the announcement of the Abbott Government’s first Federal Budget, I noticed two distinct trends emerging, particularly on Facebook. One of those was outrage at what seems to be, in the opinion of many, an especially harsh and unfair budget that will see the most vulnerable hit the hardest. The other is what I can only describe as poverty shaming.

A key sticking point among my Facebook friends was the announcement of a $7 co-payment to visit a doctor. Those who are angry at the government saw this as a measure that would negatively impact the poor and chronically ill. Others, however, seemed to be convinced that $7 is simply small change, no problem at all. One person even went so far as to say “before you whinge again about paying $7 to see a doctor, have a think about all those other poor people who never even get a chance to even fucking see one!”. I can only assume that person was referring to those in developing nations.

Here’s thing. If the co-payment had been in place a few years ago, I would have been one of those “poor people” who wouldn’t have had a chance to see a doctor. Only I wasn’t in a so-called “third-world country”. I was right here, in Australia.

I was working full time. 8am – 6pm, Monday to Friday. Sometimes on Saturdays, too – not what we seem to love referring to as a “dole bludger”. I was living alone, in a run-down cottage with 1 bedroom and no laundry facilities, which was fine because I didn’t own a washing machine. The rent included a fridge, which was great because I didn’t own one and couldn’t afford to buy one. It was the only rental property I could find that wasn’t too far away from work (necessary, as I don’t have a car) that was under $200 per week. I didn’t smoke. I drank very rarely, because my budget just didn’t allow for it. I didn’t have an internet connection. My mobile phone was prepaid and I didn’t have a landline. My rent was paid calendar monthly and one particular month it had to be paid within a few days of my gas and electricity bills. I bought my bus ticket to be able to get to and from work.

With a week until pay day, I had $6 left in my bank account.

And I hadn’t even had a chance to go grocery shopping.

I had a loaf of bread, some margarine, a box of corn flakes, some instant coffee and maybe a quarter of a litre of longlife milk to get me through the week. My phone ran out of credit. I couldn’t add any. I couldn’t call or text anyone.

I can’t remember a time in my life where I have been more ashamed.

A friend came to visit. The best I could offer her was a cup of crappy coffee, with a tiny dash of milk. I was mortified.

She came back later that day, and without saying a word, handed me two bags of groceries. I don’t think we ever spoke about it. After she left, I burst into tears. It was, and still is, quite possibly the nicest thing anyone has ever done for me. Katie, I don’t know if you realised it, but you saved me that day, and I still get teary thinking about it.

The thing about being poor is that it’s actually expensive as fuck. You don’t have the money to shell out for a quality fridge, or car, or pair of shoes, for example. Which means that what you do have doesn’t last long, or you can’t afford the cost of repairs. So life becomes a never-ending cycle of replacing shitty things with shitty things, and feeling shitty about having to do it. Not having an oven (which my little crap shack didn’t) means relying on things that can be microwaved – things that are often more expensive than fresh food. They say that “time is money”, something that is especially true if you’re poor. I was spending so much time working in order to make ends meet that I didn’t have time to hunt for another job. And job hunting itself is expensive. These days you need an internet connection, a phone with credit, access to a printer, decent clothes for interviews, and some form of transport just to actually be able to attend an interview.

Today, I consider myself lucky. I’m by no means well off. I’m incredibly grateful to receive an Australian Postgraduate Award while I do my PhD, and to be able to work part time. The combination of working and studying takes about 60 hours a week, for me to earn just under the federal minimum wage. It doesn’t mean that I can’t be outraged, and protest on behalf of those who are worse off than me. My opposition to the budget doesn’t mean that I’m outraged because it affects me personally. We can be just as outraged because it will impact others. And we should be. It’s common decency.

If the proposed $7 GP co-payment had been in place several years ago, I would have been one of “those” people who couldn’t afford to go the doctor. And if I’d been able to log on to Facebook and see people being berated and belittled for not being able to afford it, I would have felt even shittier than I already did.

If you can afford the $7 fee, that’s wonderful. If it’s not such a big deal for you, that’s great, it means you’re luckier than others. But that’s all. Luckier. Not better.

If you’re one of those less-than-empathetic people out there who thinks that $7 isn’t a big deal, think again. But think about what you’re saying. Recognise that not everyone on your friends list is as well off as you are, even if you don’t realise it. Stop poverty shaming.

And if you’re one of those people who is willing to publicly shame someone for not being able to afford $7, you’re an asshole.

This is what leadership on violence looks like.

“And perhaps most important, we need to keep saying to anyone out there who has ever been assaulted, you are not alone. You will never be alone. We have your back. I’ve got your back… I’ve often said in my travels around the world: You can judge a nation, and how successful it will be, based on how it treats its women and girls. Those nations that are successful, they’re successful in part because women and girls are valued. And I’m determined that, by that measure, the United States of America will be the global leader.”

–          Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, 22 January 2014.

 

“My father used to say that the greatest abuse of all was the abuse of power, and the cardinal sin among the abuse of power avenues that can be taken is for a man to raise his hand to a woman. That’s the cardinal sin. There’s no justification in addition for us not intervening. Men have to step up to the bar here. Men have to take more responsibility. Men have to intervene. The measure of manhood is willingness to speak up and speak out, and begin to change the culture.”

–          Joe Biden, Vice President of the United States of America, 22 January 2014.

 

Earlier this year, President Obama and Vice President Biden announced a White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. The formation of the task force was just one of the results of the tireless work of survivors, allies and activists. The initial announcement, and the resulting first task force report, demonstrates a huge step in addressing sexual assault on university campuses across the US. But more than that, it demonstrates something that is so noticeably absent in Australia when it comes to issues of violence against women – leadership and political will.

My previous post questioned the political silence surrounding domestic violence, and noted that the World Health Organization advocates for governments to recruit social, political, religious and other leaders to speak out against violence against women, a view shared by other leading bodies such as the European Union and the United Nations.

Those who are in positions of influence and authority, especially men, play a vital role in raising awareness about the issue, while challenging ideas that normalise the use of violence. Most importantly, these men – whether they are politicians, celebrities, or other notable figures, can use their influence to promote positive changes.

The Obama administration has harnessed not only the power of celebrity men in a great public service announcement campaign, 1 is 2 Many, but is also tackling the issue at a legislative level.

In short, this is what leadership looks like. Leadership that is sorely lacking when it comes to violence against women in Australia.

A recent spike in domestic and family violence related deaths continues to see silence from the leader of our nation, Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Silence that, to me, suggests that the lives of women and children hold little value to Prime Minister Abbott.

Domestic Violence NSW has started an online petition urging the Prime Minister to take the urgent political action that is required to end the unnecessary domestic violence deaths that take the lives of over 50 women every year and to recognise that domestic and family violence is a national emergency. I ask that everyone who reads this signs and shares this petition with as many others as possible. It’s time that we forced our “leader” to step up and lead.

Today, May 7th, is National Domestic Violence Remembrance Day. A day to remember those who have died, and the ones left behind, due to domestic and family violence.

A day to remember those that we ignored, that we failed.

Now, it’s inevitable that someone out there will respond saying that we didn’t simply ignore these deaths. And on that, I call bullshit. Sure, we dedicated several column inches in daily newspapers, and segments on the nightly news to those that lost their lives. And then, when all the hand-wringing and discussions on how awful it was, we forgot. We moved on with our lives, without taking any action, until news of the next death broke. Then it became more collective hand-wringing, more wondering about why it had happened once more. And again, we moved on.

From each of these deaths that were reported in the news, there will be another that the media didn’t pick up on. For each of these deaths, countless more women and children will still be living in terror and danger. For each of these deaths that were reported from the beginning of this year, we made our comments about how awful it was, and we moved on:

 

Therese Brown, 52 years old. Died 3 January 2014.

Victoria Comrie Cullen, 39 years old. Died 22 January 2014.

Luke Batty, 11 years old. Died 12 February 2014.

Margaret Tannous, 47 years old. Died 17 February 2014.

Baby girl (name unknown), 11 months old. Died 2 April 2014.

Fiona Warzywoda, 33 years old. Died 16 April 2014.

Savannah, 4 years old, and Indianna, 3 years old. Died 20 April 2014.

Woman (name unknown), 47 years old. Died 30 April 2014.

 

And these are just the tip of the iceberg, the deaths that have occurred and been reported on in the last five months.

Domestic and family violence is a national emergency. And a national disgrace. We need to stop the silence, the quick mention on the daily news, the forgetting. We need real, tangible action. We need political will. And for that, we need a leader.

 

 

Take action and demand leadership on domestic and family violence. Contact Prime Minister Abbott and your local MP here.

If you, or someone you know, is experience domestic violence you can get 24/7 help by contacting 1800Respect via their website or on 1800 737 732. 

 

 

The political silence on domestic violence.

“Brutal people, often with a history of violence, are getting it into their heads to pick on a vulnerable individual. It is utterly cowardly. It’s brutal, it’s gratuitous, it’s utterly unprovoked and it should be dealt with very severely by the police and the courts…

As Prime Minister I accept that the fundamental responsibility in this area lies with state governments. It’s not just Barry O’Farrell’s problem, it’s an issue that communities are facing in suburbs and regional centres across Australia.

While we all want to see the courts absolutely throw the book at people who perpetrate this kind of gratuitous, unprovoked violence, we have to recognise that courts can only act after a crime…

We need to tackle this issue in a comprehensive and considered way. We don’t need kneejerk reactions and stunts that give the illusion of action, but don’t make any real, lasting difference…

While this is not an easy area, with much control in the hands of state and local governments, the Commonwealth stands ready to work with the states, parents and communities to tackle this scourge.”

– Prime Minister Tony Abbott in the Daily Telegraph, January 10, 2014.

 

Prime Minister Abbott’s article followed the tragic death of one-punch victim, Daniel Christie. I’ve written previously about the public outrage we saw in the days following the brutal assault on Daniel Christie. The almost continuous media coverage, the calls for tougher penalties, the demands to change the so-called “king to hit” to “cowards punch”. It was a post that got a huge reaction, not least of which saw some fairly nasty hate mail sent my way. Evidently, some view it as unacceptable to question why these kinds of incidents get more outcry than other equally violent and horrific acts.

Daniel was Australia’s 15th “king hit” fatality in just six years, and the 91st since the year 2000. These deaths are unnecessary and unbelievably heartbreaking. The public fury is justified, and Prime Minister Abbott’s words were accurate and, I’m sure, heartfelt.

It’s been eight days since I wrote my last blog post.

Just two days after writing it, a woman was stabbed to death by her ex-partner. Several days after that, two young girls were allegedly killed by their father, who had separated from their mother. A “domestic dispute” resulted in a 16 year old girl being beaten with a baseball bat by a man who is then alleged to have taken his three year old daughter, because he couldn’t find his ex-partner, and later abandoned her in a burning car. A man is in hospital under police guard, following the discovery of the body of a woman in Sydney.

Four incidents of horrendous domestic violence, all within the space of five days.

Every week in Australia, one woman dies as a result of domestic violence. That’s 52 women every year.

There have been 91 deaths from “king hits” in Australia since the year 2000. The victims of street violence are predominantly male.

In the same period in which 91 people died as a result of “one-punch hits”, over 700 women have died due to domestic violence.

700 women.

In its recommendations on addressing issues involving violence against women, the World Health Organization advocates that governments “enlist social, political, religious and other leaders in speaking out against violence against women”, noting that “people – particularly men – in positions of authority and influence (e.g. political, religious, and traditional leaders) can play an important role in raising awareness about the problem of violence against women, challenging commonly held misconceptions and norms, and shaping the discussion in ways that promote positive change”.

On this issue, particularly given the shocking events of the last week, our political leader – Prime Minister (and self-appointed head of the Australian Government Office for Women) Abbott – has been notably silent.

In the lead up to the last federal election, the Liberal Party of Australia critiqued the then-government, led by Julia Gillard, stating: “regrettably, the Gillard Government has been strong on rhetoric but weak on delivery when it comes to addressing violence against women and their children.”

The Liberal Party, it seems, is weak on both delivery and rhetoric.

According to their website, one of the roles of the Office for Women is to provide “national leadership on a range of priority issues including safety for women”.

The silence of both the Prime Minister, and the Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Women, Senator Michaelia Cash, on the deadly issue of domestic violence demonstrates a total failure on this objective.

Last night on the ABC’s program, 7.30, the CEO of Domestic Violence Victoria, Fiona McCormack noted that “if women and children were being abused and murdered by strangers at the rate at which they’re being abused and murdered by men in their family, there’d be taskforces, there’d be funding, there’d be political will. But as it is, it’s largely being met by political ambivalence”.

Whilst I wholeheartedly agree with the incredible Ms. McCormack, I think we need to recognise that the issues of males being abused and murdered by strangers – largely other males – via “king hits” saw a large amount of political will behind ending the violence. Political will, that seemingly doesn’t exist when it comes to ending violence against women.

I certainly don’t have the answers. I don’t know what, exactly, it will take to end Australia’s shocking rates of domestic violence.

I do know that the silence from our nation’s leaders is not what we need. Staying silent about domestic violence is as good as condoning it. If Prime Minister Abbott can speak up about the 91 lives we lost to street violence since 2000, he needs to be able to do the same about the 700 women whose lives have been lost to domestic violence in the same time period.

As it stands, our Prime Minister’s silence speaks volumes.

If you’re not angry, you’re not paying attention.

I’m over it.

I’m so fucking over it. And if you’re not over it as well; if you’re not angry about it, you’re not paying attention.

It’s a topic I’ve written about before. A lot, actually. And I’ll keep writing about it, keep speaking about it, and keep being furious about it until somebody listens.

Figures from the New South Wales Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research showed that domestic violence bucked the state-wide decline in all other major offences in December 2013, reaching its highest level in 15 years, according to reports last week.

On average, New South Wales police receive 94 domestic violence assault reports every single day. That’s over three women per hour.

Three women an hour. And much like the issue of sexual assault, the media and public outcry has been practically non-existent.

Once again, I want to know why the fuck we’re not all screaming for harsher sentences, just like we did with the “king hit” or “coward punch”. I want to know where the fuck the wall-to-wall media coverage is. I want to know where the politicians are and why they’re not rushing through new legislation that ensures harsh penalties for perpetrators.

Why are we continuing to fail victims of domestic violence?

All of the statistics tell us that women are predominantly the victims of domestic violence, while men are the primary perpetrators. “King hit” victims, however, a predominantly males.

Do we need to draw the seemingly inevitable conclusion that the reason that domestic violence doesn’t get the same level of outrage is because the victims are women? To me, there doesn’t seem to be an alternative answer.

Australian society simply seems to consider women second-class citizens. Those female victims of domestic violence? They’re not as important as the males who get punched on a night out. They don’t deserve the laws, the attention, or the collective outrage.

Now, it seems that whenever violence against women is mentioned, there will always be men (and some women) who get all up in arms, decrying the author for tarring all men with the same brush. If any of those people are reading this, I would like to say this: you’re getting angry about the wrong fucking thing. Don’t be pissed off because people are pointing out the facts – men are the principal perpetrators of domestic violence against women. Those are the facts. Get angry about that. Get angry that these males are giving you a bad name. And get angry that very little is being said or done about it.

Because if you’re angry that the media, a blogger, or someone on twitter is pointing out the facts, you’re not paying attention to the real goddamn problem. You’re ignoring those three women per hour in New South Wales, and women just like them around the country.

If, like me, you’re over the deafening silence from mainstream media and politicians from all sides of the spectrum, speak up. Contact Prime Minster Tony Abbott (a.k.a the Minister for Women), Senator Michaelia Cash, the Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Women, and your local MP here.

If you, or someone you know, is experience domestic violence you can get 24/7 help by contacting 1800Respect via their website or on 1800 737 732.